We offer a full range of mental health services with a special
emphasis on the needs of children, adolescents, and families.

How We Help Our Clients

Relationships are the heartbeats of our lives. When there are problems relating to others in the family and socially it can impact every area of an individual’s life. For these unique issues, there are several different types of therapy in which our therapists have specialized training, to help each client’s unique needs.

Our therapists allow children to “work through” their challenges through the play itself or provide targeted intervention through specific activities by combining EMDR with other types of therapy. Utilizing a trust-based approach, we assist young people to identify the causes of their distress. Our specially trained therapists help them to acquire the skills necessary to encourage lasting change and a deeper self-understanding. Through a cooperative process, individuals are able to become more self-aware. Through the course of their development, our highly trained therapists provide the support and caring necessary to navigate this journey. Our therapists feel privileged and grateful for the opportunity to work with our clients; as they work hard to move forward with a clearer understanding of themselves and the important relationships in their lives.


About Us

As a mental health clinic and training center, our therapists cover a range of experience levels and training. Our therapists are trained in EMDR or Eating Disorder Issues, in addition to attachment/trauma challenges. We believe in the power of healing relationships and families.

Our Mission

Our mission is to promote the growth and healthy functioning of individuals and families through professional guidance. We offer a full range of mental health services, with a special emphasis on services for clients with attachment, trauma, and eating disorder challenges.

Meet our Staff

...

Teresa Brown
Certified EMDR & IATP Therapist
Registered Play Therapist

281-504-8004
M.Ed., LPC, NCC, RPT
TeresaB@atchouston.com

Ms. Brown is committed to helping children, adolescents, and their families in their journey of hope and healing. Fifteen years of experience in the public school system as a special education educator and school counselor provides an insight into academic issues. She has pursued specialized training in therapies that are evidenced based in healing attachment and trauma issues for individual and their families. It is her belief that through a collaborative approach there is hope for your child and family to heal.

Marilyn Crawford Photo

Marilyn Crawford
EMDR Therapist
Child/Adolescent Trauma Specialist

281-504-8004
M.A., LPC, CATP
MarilynC@atchouston.com

Ms. Crawford has a welcoming way with young clients and their parents. She provides a safe and nurturing environment for children to express feelings and thoughts about what is going on in their lives. She works with parents to better understand their child and to create closer relationships. The goal of her collaborative counseling approach is based on bringing every child and parent’s inherent strengths back into focus to achieve healthy relationships. She believes it is an honor and privilege to work with families at a critical time in their lives.

...

Liz Steele
Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Supervisor
Registered Play Therapist, Supervisor

281-504-8004
LCSW-S, RPT-S
LizS@atchouston.com

Coming from the heart, Liz offers compassion in a warm, accepting and supportive environment, having worked as a healing professional for 23 years. Her philosophy is one of a "strengths based and resiliency perspective" --where knowledge, skills and strategies are used in a solution-focused approach that empowers adults and families, children and adolescents, to tap their inner resources in order to move toward healing and growth.

Liz has worked with children, adolescents and adults dealing with grief and loss issues, depression and anxiety, counseled kids with school and peer problems and low self-esteem and helped families adjust due to major life changes. She has counseled individuals who are recovering from abuse and trauma and is trained in EMDR. Through a client-centered, humanistic view, and at times employing the creative arts and "homework," she works with a wide range of emotional and behavioral issues to help individuals and families explore their problems, work through their emotions and learn healthy coping skills to find resolution.

Whitney Harken Photo

Whitney Harken
Certified Eating Disorder Specialist
Certified Family Based Treatment Therapist

281-504-8004
MSW, LCSW, CEDS
WhitneyH@atchouston.com

Ms. Harken is dedicated to supporting children, adolescents, and young adults struggling with eating disorders as well as their loved ones. Family involvement and support is critical for anyone to overcome their battle with an eating disorder. Ms. Harken has walked alongside many individuals and families over the years to achieve full recovery. Learning how to live a life you want and deserve free from the struggles of an eating disorder is possible through hard work, dedication, and treatment.


Services

There are many types of therapy for children. We are eclectic in our approach interweaving various evidence-based modalities to provide the unique approach each child needs to heal. We allow children to “work through” their problems through the play itself or it can serve as a catalyst for meaningful dialogue between the child and therapist.

These are the therapies we offer for children: (click on the name of the therapy to learn more about it)

The foundation of therapy is the relationship with a trusted, specially trained therapist who can help young people deal with the causes of distress and help them acquire the skills to cope more adaptively in the future.  The goal is to create a situation in which adolescents can express themselves fully in order to develop self-understanding and new, lasting changes in emotional states and behavior. Therapy with children and adolescents is a collaborative endeavor with parents or caregivers.

These are the therapies we offer for adolescents: (click on the name of the therapy to learn more about it)

Individual therapy is a collaborative process through which individuals work one-on-one with a trained therapist in a safe, caring, and confidential environment to explore their feelings, beliefs, or behaviors, identify aspects of their lives that they would like to change, better understand themselves and others, set personal goals, and work toward desired change.  The overall goal of therapy is to increase one’s sense of well-being.

These are the therapies we offer for adults: (click on the name of the therapy to learn more about it)


Play Therapy

Initially developed in the turn of the 20th century, today play therapy refers to a large number of treatment methods, all applying the therapeutic benefits of play. Play therapy differs from regular play in that the therapist helps children to address and resolve their own problems. Play therapy builds on the natural way that children learn about themselves and their relationships in the world around them (Axline, 1947; Carmichael, 2006; Landreth, 2002). Through play therapy, children learn to communicate with others, express feelings, modify behavior, develop problem-solving skills, and learn a variety of ways of relating to others. Play provides a safe psychological distance from their problems and allows expression of thoughts and feelings appropriate to their development.

Play is a fun, enjoyable activity that elevates our spirits and brightens our outlook on life. It expands self-expression, self- knowledge, self-actualization and self-efficacy. Play relieves feelings of stress and boredom, connects us to people in a positive way, stimulates creative thinking and exploration, regulates our emotions, and boosts our ego (Landreth, 2002). In addition, play allows us to practice skills and roles needed for survival.

Children are referred for play therapy to resolve their problems (Carmichael; 2006; Schaefer, 1993). Often, children have used up their own problem solving tools, and they misbehave, may act out at home, with friends, and at school (Landreth, 2002). Play therapy allows trained mental health practitioners who specialize in play therapy, to assess and understand children's play. Further, play therapy is utilized to help children cope with difficult emotions and find solutions to problems.

Ms. Brown will discuss this at the intake interview with the parent/parents. Each child is unique and requires a special response for this question. She also provides handouts and brochures to insure you are comfortable responding to questions your child may have.

Ms. Brown meets with parents at feedback sessions throughout the process. She is available to provide assistance when issues arise between sessions. You can also meet briefly with her before a child’s session, if necessary.

Please allow your child to tell you as little or as much they would like about their time in the playroom. It is not helpful to ask questions about the sessions, this can make the child uncomfortable. There may be times when a session is emotionally difficult for your child, this may lead to an increase in difficult behaviors. This is normal and can be expected as they process through the issues that are concerning them. You can contact Ms. Brown to discuss strategies if you are concerned.

There are toys, paint, clay, playdoh, and sand in the playroom. Things can get messy, so please dress your child in clothes that can be soiled without any concerns.

Andrew's Day: Video

Play is a child's first language. When a child plays they express thoughts and feelings that would otherwise remain hidden. That's why play therapy is such a powerful tool to address a child's behavioral and emotional challenges.

Why Choose a Registered Play Therapist?

There is another credential that play therapists in the United States can achieve called the Registered Play Therapist (RPT). This credential is provided through the Association for Play Therapy. It requires the play therapist to have at least a master's degree and license in a mental health field, to complete a substantial amount of play therapy training, to have extensive clinical experience, and to have received play therapy supervision.


Sandtray Therapy

It is a form of expressive therapy. Sandtray Therapy allows a person to construct his or her own story using miniature figures and sand. The story created can be a reflection of the person’s own life and allows them to resolve conflicts, remove obstacles, and gain acceptance of self.

This type of therapy is often used with children, but can be applied to adults, teens, couples, families, and groups as well. Many children are unable to verbalize emotional states, particularly in the face of trauma, neglect, or abuse. This method of therapy serves as a valuable and powerful outlet for children and an incredibly insightful method of gaining access to traumatic experiences.

It was developed by Margaret Lowenfeld in London in the 1920’s. Humans think in images and not words, they can see their world in the sandtray story. She discovered it was very beneficial for children because of their limited verbal ability express feelings.

The non-verbal nature of Sandtray Therapy and the familiar medium of sand can help children achieve feelings of comfort and security. With little instruction from the therapist, the child is free to play and develop his or her own expression of situations. Often the children will experience a sense of independent play and will begin making assumptions and behavior changes without cues from the therapist.

Sandtray Therapy can be combined to tell the child's story as EMDR allows the brain to heal the child's mixed up thoughts about an event or feeling. It can also be integrated into play therapy.

Figures and objects from culture and nature symbolize events and situations in our inner and outer life.

Children select and place objects, while moving the sand to create scenes expressing their deepest concerns.


Sandtray Therapy Video

While play is a fun activity that can help a child learn, it can also be used to help children who have experienced trauma, learn coping skills. Well take a look at the benefits of sand play therapy. 0 to 5 in 30 Minutes! is a product of Valley Public Television. The program is sponsored by First 5 Fresno County, First 5 Tulare County, and First 5 Madera County.



Theraplay

Theraplay® provides techniques for children and families to create relationships that are based on nurturing and trust. The joy that play brings to children is also brought into the parent child relationship.

Theraplay® focuses on four central parent/child connection areas: nurture, structure, engagement, and challenge. Attachment and trust between parent and child are built through activities that encourage a secure bond for the child with the caregiver. Through play children are able to build self-esteem, trust, become more regulated, and connect with others in a meaningful and authentic way. Healing from trauma can be healed with techniques that are used allowing children and their families to reconnect with a safe and secure attachment. Theraplay can be especially beneficial for foster/adopt families.

Theraplay is appropriate for children of all ages, including babies. It can also be beneficial for teenagers when combined with other techniques.

Parents and caregivers are eventually able to use these techniques with the child at home continuing to build a connected relationship with their child.
Theraplay has been used since 1975 in 36 countries and is a research based therapeutic modality for all ages, including babies.

A child begins to view themselves as lovable and deserving of relationships with others as a result of the enjoyable social connection experienced with Theraplay.

More information about Theraplay and The Theraplay Institute are available at:
http://www.theraplay.org/index.php/about-tti


EMDR: Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) is a psychotherapy that enables people to heal from the symptoms and emotional distress that are the result of disturbing life experiences. Repeated studies show that by using EMDR people can experience the benefits of psychotherapy that once took years to make a difference.

EMDR therapy shows that the mind can in fact heal from psychological trauma much as the body recovers from physical trauma. When you cut your hand, your body works to close the wound. If a foreign object or repeated injury irritates the wound, it festers and causes pain. Once the block is removed, healing resumes. EMDR therapy demonstrates that a similar sequence of events occurs with mental processes. The brain’s information processing system naturally moves toward mental health. If the system is blocked by the impact of a disturbing event, the emotional wound festers and can cause intense suffering. Once the block is removed, healing resumes. Using the detailed protocols and procedures learned in EMDR training sessions, clinicians help clients activate their natural healing processes.

For children, EMDR allows them to remove mixed-up thoughts or feelings. These thoughts can be like a heavy bag the child carries until the thoughts are healed. Tapping, eye movement, and bilateral stimulation can be used to allow the brain to heal.

Yes, it is. There are several providers who specialize in providing EMDR Training focused on helping children. Ms. Brown has pursued extensive additional training regarding the use of EMDR with children.

Attachment Therapy

Throughout life, each of us will form thousands of relationships. These bonds take many forms. Some are enduring and intimate-our dearest friend- while others are transient and superficial-the chatty store clerk. Together, relationships in all forms create the glue of a family, community, and society. This capacity to form and maintain relationships is the most important trait of humankind, for without it none of us would survive, learn, work, or procreate.

The first and most important of all relationships are attachment bonds. Initially, these are created through interactions with our primary caregivers, usually parents. First, relationships help define our capacity for attachment and set the tone for all of our future relationships.

Attachments influence the developing brain, which in turn affects future interactions with others, self-esteem, self-control, and the ability to learn and to achieve optimum mental and physical health. Symptoms can include the following:

  • Low self esteem
  • Needy, clingy or pseudo-independent behavior
  • Inability to deal with stress and adversity
  • Lack of self-control
  • Inability to develop and maintain friendships
  • Alienation from and opposition to parents, caregivers, and other authority figures
  • Antisocial attitudes and behaviors
  • Aggression and violence
  • Difficulty with genuine trust, intimacy, and affection
  • Negative, hopeless, pessimistic view of self, family and society
  • Lack of empathy, compassion and remorse
  • Behavioral and academic problems at school
  • Speech and language problems
  • Incessant chatter and questions
  • Difficulty learning
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Apathy
  • Susceptibility to chronic illness
  • Obsession with food: hordes, gorges, refuses to eat, eats strange things, hides food
  • Repetition of the cycle of maltreatment and attachment disorder in their own children when they reach adulthood
  • Sensory Processing Disorder

We have learned through neuroscience that various well-intentioned and unavoidable situations could possibly have a negative impact on the attachment of a child.

Necessary medical interventions, chronic ear infections, asthma, stress for the mother during pregnancy, difficult birth, and hospitalization, especially in the first three years, could affect a child’s ability to trust adults.

“Even in utero and after birth, for every moment of every day, our brain is processing the nonstop set of incoming signals from our senses. Sight, sound, touch, smell, taste—all of the raw sensory data that will result in these sensations enter the lower parts of the brain and begin a multistage process of being categorized, compared to previously stored patterns, and ultimately, if necessary, acted upon.”

Perry, Bruce D. Dr. The Boy Who Was Raised As a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's Notebook: What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us About Loss, Love and Healing. 2007.

Pre-genetic disposition may also impact a child’s emotional development and self-regulation ability, children who are genetically wired to be more anxious may possibly interpret facial expressions and body language in a negative manner.

According to Seigel and Hartzell, (2003) a parent’s own unresolved issues from their childhood may impact their ability to effectively respond in parenting, causing them to become frozen in their ability to adapt to their own role of caring for their children in a clear and consistent manner. This has the potential to have a generational effect in parenting. We genuinely believe that parents do the best that they can with what they have been given (through their childhood experiences). If parents do not know how to meet their children’s needs because they did not experience this, they need to be shown.

Neuroscience has revealed that brain plasticity is possible throughout life. This provides an opportunity to rewire the brain and the response to relationships.

Awareness is such a powerful tool and parents are generally eager to learn, it can be helpful to be shown by someone who has the knowledge either through professional training, research, or experience.

We can learn to re-wire the brain through pattern-repetitive behavior that will forms new connections (new blueprints in our brain). Parenting psycho-education is vital for helping parents learn to attune to their children’s needs, how to regulate them (mind and body) and how to form healthy attachment relationships that will serve as a resiliency factor throughout the lifespan.

Alvarado, (2008)

“when relationships hurt, we learn not to trust in relationships, whether at work, school or home.” we work with people to help change the blueprints that people carry with them to form new understanding about people and the world around us.”

This is a core belief for our therapists in our center and is the foundation of our work.

Even if your parents loved you, they may not have been capable of meeting your needs.

As babies, when we reach out and no one reaches back, when we express needs and no one listens, we often give up. Or if our caregiver is present some of the time and neglectful or abusive at others we become confused and keep reaching, keep hoping someone will be there.

In this process, we decide things about ourselves, such as “I must be unlovable” or “something must be wrong with me.” We then begin a lifelong quest to either avoid real intimacy or to find it, but when it shows up, in our desperation, we often unconsciously push it away. This longing and/or dissatisfaction often leads to anxiety, depression, co-dependency, addictions, fear of intimacy, rigidity, and wanting to hurt or be hurt as well as a failure to thrive as adults.

The brain remains flexible throughout life, nonverbal communication retains the capacity to change. Studies in people over age ninety show us images of mature brains that continue to produce new neural pathways at a time when older pathways are dying.

The same experiential and social factors that profoundly shape the brain initially can also be instrumental in repairing the causes and symptoms of stress related disorders.

For Children & Adolescents:

We use an approach that combines Eye Movement Desensitization Response (EMDR), Integrative Family Attachment Trauma Protocol (IATP), and Trust Based Relationship Intervention (TBRI©). These are evidence based therapy modalities that provide an approach that heals the entire family, providing behavioral changes that allow the child to improve their emotional regulation skills.

The family is guided through a process that involves a series of specific EMDR interventions in addition to parenting strategies to strengthen and build the attachment in the relationships. The parenting strategies are at the foundation of our work, since traditional behavior methods are not a successful approach for children with attachment/trauma challenges.

For Adults:

Our evidence-based therapy utilizing Eye Movement Desensitization (EMDR) and Attachment based therapy can help you change the effects of an “adult attachment disorder” with our nurturing processes and experiences within a safe and caring environment.

Here we gently and safely guide you to discover your early experiences, beliefs, and coping strategies that keep you from having the love you want or keeping the love you find.

EMDR and attachment based therapy goes a lot deeper than talk therapy. The goal is to free a person from the unresolved emotions and triggers so that he or she becomes freer to live in the present.

Using EMDR to process traumatic events allows you to work through the emotions and sensory memories stored with them. In re-examining them, you are able to feel those feelings now, work through them now and defuse them once and for all. The released emotional pain is no longer repressed and allowed to fester.

You will discover the roots of current relationship issues and heal them at the source, giving you an experience of your authentic self. You will begin to experience yourself as lovable, capable, and worthy and will learn strategies to continue to build your newfound feelings of safety and potential as well as the skills to build healthy relationships and be more successful in every area of your life.


Trauma Therapy

Traumatization is stress frozen in place –locked into a pattern of neurological distress that doesn’t go away by returning to a state of equilibrium. Traumatization promotes ongoing disability that can take many mental, social, emotional and physical forms.

Much like stress, trauma is experienced uniquely by each person. Traumatized children have impaired wiring in the brain’s limbic system and altered levels of stress hormones, resulting in anxiety, depression, and self-regulation problems. Effective treatment and parenting rewires the limbic system and reduces the biochemistry of stress.

The ability to recognize emotional trauma has changed radically over the course of history. Until recently psychological trauma was noted only in men after catastrophic wars. The women's movement in the sixties broadened the definition of emotional trauma to include physical and sexual abuse of women and children.

Now, the impact of psychological trauma has extended to experiences that include:

  • Natural disasters, such as earthquakes, fires, floods, hurricanes, etc.
  • Physical assault, including rape, incest, molestation, domestic abuse and serious bodily harm
  • Serious accidents, such as automobile or other high-impact scenarios
  • Experiencing or witnessing horrific injury, carnage or fatalities
Other often overlooked potential sources of psychological trauma include:
  • Adoption
  • Falls or sports injuries
  • Surgery, particularly emergency, and medical interventions especially in first 3 years of life
  • Serious illness, especially when accompanied by very high fever
  • Neurological disruption caused by experiences in the womb
  • Birth trauma
  • NICU after birth
  • Hearing about violence to or sudden death of someone close
  • An auto accident considered minor by adults
  • The breakup of a significant relationship
  • A humiliating or deeply disappointing experience
  • Forced separation very early in life from the primary caregiver
  • Chronic mis-attunement of a caregiver to a child's attachment signals ("mal-attachment")
  • Moving, changing schools, or change in life circumstances
  • Bullying
  • Isolation/lack of healthy attachments
  • Sudden loud noises for babies or young children
  • Recurrent medical issues early in life for example: Ear infections, asthma, seizures, reflux, allergies
  • Caregivers with insecure attachment styles of their own or unresolved baggage of their own
  • Genetic predisposition

We have learned through neuroscience that various well-intentioned and unavoidable situations could possibly have a negative impact on the attachment of a child.

Necessary medical interventions, chronic ear infections, asthma, stress for the mother during pregnancy, difficult birth, and hospitalization, especially in the first three years, could affect a child’s ability to trust adults.

“Even in utero and after birth, for every moment of every day, our brain is processing the nonstop set of incoming signals from our senses. Sight, sound, touch, smell, taste—all of the raw sensory data that will result in these sensations enter the lower parts of the brain and begin a multistage process of being categorized, compared to previously stored patterns, and ultimately, if necessary, acted upon.”

Perry, Bruce D. Dr. The Boy Who Was Raised As a Dog: And Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist's Notebook: What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us About Loss, Love and Healing. 2007.

Pre-genetic disposition may also impact a child’s emotional development and self-regulation ability, children who are genetically wired to be more anxious may possibly interpret facial expressions and body language in a negative manner.

According to Seigel and Hartzell, (2003) a parent’s own unresolved issues from their childhood may impact their ability to effectively respond in parenting, causing them to become frozen in their ability to adapt to their own role of caring for their children in a clear and consistent manner. This has the potential to have a generational effect in parenting. We genuinely believe that parents do the best that they can with what they have been given (through their childhood experiences). If parents do not know how to meet their children’s needs because they did not experience this, they need to be shown.

Neuroscience has revealed that brain plasticity is possible throughout life. This provides an opportunity to rewire the brain and the response to relationships.

Awareness is such a powerful tool and parents are generally eager to learn, it can be helpful to be shown by someone who has the knowledge either through professional training, research, or experience.

We can learn to re-wire the brain through pattern-repetitive behavior that will forms new connections (new blueprints in our brain). Parenting psycho-education is vital for helping parents learn to attune to their children’s needs, how to regulate them (mind and body) and how to form healthy attachment relationships that will serve as a resiliency factor throughout the lifespan.

Alvarado, (2008)

“when relationships hurt, we learn not to trust in relationships, whether at work, school or home.” we work with people to help change the blueprints that people carry with them to form new understanding about people and the world around us.”

This is a core belief for our therapists in our center and is the foundation of our work.

Even if your parents loved you, they may not have been capable of meeting your needs.

As babies, when we reach out and no one reaches back, when we express needs and no one listens, we often give up. Or if our caregiver is present some of the time and neglectful or abusive at others we become confused and keep reaching, keep hoping someone will be there.

In this process, we decide things about ourselves, such as “I must be unlovable” or “something must be wrong with me.” We then begin a lifelong quest to either avoid real intimacy or to find it, but when it shows up, in our desperation, we often unconsciously push it away. This longing and/or dissatisfaction often leads to anxiety, depression, co-dependency, addictions, fear of intimacy, rigidity, and wanting to hurt or be hurt as well as a failure to thrive as adults.

The brain remains flexible throughout life, nonverbal communication retains the capacity to change. Studies in people over age ninety show us images of mature brains that continue to produce new neural pathways at a time when older pathways are dying.

The same experiential and social factors that profoundly shape the brain initially can also be instrumental in repairing the causes and symptoms of stress related disorders.

Trauma intervention is needed to allow the brain to process the event to prevent triggers of emotions in the future. All ages can benefit from therapy to process the trauma through neuroscience there is evidence of the plasticity of the brain to heal until death.

Trauma is a sensory experience and it is an experience like no other, commonly marked by a state of terror and powerlessness. Individuals of all ages can experience trauma, including infants and children.

Even when we do not consciously recall our trauma experiences (because of our age or protective functions such as repression) our body holds the memory, as does our mind. Regardless of the level of perceived intensity of effect on an individual, treatment promotes resilience later in life.

Traumatizing events can take a serious emotional toll on those involved, even if the event did not cause physical damage.


Family Based Treatment (FBT) for Eating Disorders

Eating disorder therapy can include individual and family therapy or Family Based Treatment (FBT). FBT is an intensive outpatient treatment for adolescents and young adults struggling with an eating disorder.

During FBT, parents/caregivers play an active and positive role in order to help restore their child’s weight to a healthy place, then work to slowly and thoughtfully to hand back control to their child once appropriate to do so. During the last phase of treatment, normal adolescent development obstacles and goals will be discussed and practiced.  

Individuals struggling with eating disorder may experience many of the following signs but not all:

  • Significant weight loss due to dietary restriction and/or over exercise
  • hyper focus on weight loss and/or “being skinny"
  • intense fear of being “fat”
  • researching recipes/diet foods
  • cooking foods but unable to eat them
  • cutting out food groups from diet without medical reason to do so
  • social withdrawl
  • low self esteem
  • decreased mood and energy
  • attempting unhealthy weight loss methods
  • physical symptoms of malnutrition (dizziness, weakness, irritability, change in skin color, feeling cold when others are not, etc)
  • feeling out of control when eating
  • vomiting food and/or using laxatives or medications to lose weight
  • hiding and/or lying about food
  • self harm

* please consult with a medical provider if you or your loved one are experiencing any of these physical symptoms.

  • FBT is an evidenced based treatment for adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa.
  • Eating Disorders are not a result of “poor parenting” or mistakes made by loved ones.
  • Eating disorders are complex illnesses with biological, genetic, psychological, social, and developmental causes.
  • Eating Disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.
  • Recovery is absolutely possible with hard work and dedication to treatment.
  • Every individual undergoing FBT MUST be under the supervision of a medical provider.
  • The FBT therapist and the medical provider have to communicate with one another to ensure the safety of every individual during their treatment and recovery.

Your child may or may not be willing to seek treatment which is okay and a normal part of the illness. Recovery is still possible. Average length of treatment in FBT is 9-12 months which starts off with weekly appointments and spaces out to every 2-3 weeks when appropriate.

Individual therapy for eating disorders is typically longer, 1-2 years average duration. If additional services or supports are needed during or after treatment, your therapist will discuss what resources are available.

Contact Us

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 Office Address

The Atrium at Sugar Creek
101 Southwestern Blvd.
Suite 105
Sugar Land, Tx 77478

Call Us

281-504-8004

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teresab@tbrowntherapy.com